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Dota 2 Lost It's Most Successful Team in History



MVP Phoenix, highly regarded as the most successful South Korean Dota 2 team in history, has officially disbanded into the wind.



Support player Kim “Dubu” Doo-young was the first to part ways with the roster on January 1, following a disastrous performance at the Boston Major in December where MVP Phoenix placed last. Since then, the remaining four players: Lee “Forev” Sang-don, Kim “QO” Seon-yeob, Kim “Velo” Tae-sung, and Kim “Febby” Yong-min, have also left the team.

As a result, the management has decided to shutter its MVP Phoenix division. Hot6ix and Aegis, the two remaining Dota 2 rosters under the South Korean organization, are slated to combine into a single team. We’ve grown accustomed to MVP fielding multiple Dota 2 rosters in the past couple of years. 2017, however, will see that change.

Farewell to @QOdota @Velodota2 @Febbydota @DubuDota #Forev
Thank you for great service in our team. We hope best wishes for you guys. https://t.co/ftmGMxYjCZ
— Team MVP (@MVP_GG) January 9, 2017


MVP Phoenix witnessed great success last year. It secured two international LAN events and placed in the top six of two Majors in the same year. Throughout its professional career, MVP Phoenix raked in more than $2 million in prize money. As such, many woeful fans believe that there will be no other South Korean Dota 2 team that can match the accomplishments of MVP Phoenix.

Despite a successful year, many players on the roster had begun searching for opportunities to play abroad. It’s presumed that the abysmal performance at the Boston Major hammered the final nail in the coffin and forced the players to abandon the team in pursuit of their goals.

Forev played for Team Secret before rejoining MVP Phoenix in November. Febby signed up with Fnatic last week, while QO joined former Evil Geniuses support player-turned-CEO Peter “ppd” Dager in a team named WanteD that will be competing in the upcoming qualifiers for the Kiev Major which begins on Apr. 20.

The saddening news of its shuttering just accentuates the fact of how volatile the esports industry is. Nothing lasts forever, and in esports that’s a pretty short duration to begin with.

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